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.« 7 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

£ £ ~7 J~i /? Bureau of Agricultural Economics J^^K bj hi. a^^S^ 

Division of Cotton Marketing' /f* ft 6CEfVe^^ 

QMMVO ^f' Atlanta!! GtorgiyL 3 \%A » 

. J Releaee-**«A1:00 a.m. CS.T. 0ctoD%>,7, 1933 . 1 

If \K ^ *-fv- 

COTTCN GRADE AND STAPLE REPORTS EOR WEEK ENDING 0CTaBER ; .S' c 



/ 



The cotton ginned this week in the Southeastern States^stiowed some 
improvement in grade and considerable improvement in staple length over 
that ginned last week. For the past few weeks the trend has "been toward 
lower grades and shorter staple lengths, hut this week a pronounced better- 
ment in quality was shown. 

Georgia.-- This weekUfi percent of the ginnings was White Middling 
and better against 35 percent last week. About 24 percent of the cotton 
ginned in the Sand and Clay Hills district of southwest Georgia this 
week consisted of grades conforming to the Extra White Standards. For 
the entire State only 1.4 percent of the cotton ginned was Extra White, 
and this was a larger proportion than that shown for any other Southeastern 
State. 

The improvement in staple length was very pronounced. This week 
less than 4 percent of the ginnings was shorter than Jf& inch against 
26 percent last week. The proportion of 1 inch and longer shifted from 
2 percent last week to S percent this week. 

Alabama . - The grades of cotton ginned in Alabama compare favorably 
with the grades for the e'tia&T Southeastern States. To date about 70 
percent of the cotton has been White Middling and better with only 2-1/2 
percent included within White grades below Middling. About 27-1/2 percent 
wf the ginnings to date have conformed to the Spotted and Tinged Standards. 

The proportion of cotton shorter than inch was only 6 percent 
this week compared with about 26 percent last week. To date 12 percent of 
the ginnings in Alabama had staple length less than 7/g inch. Staple 1 
inch and longer is about 5 percent of the total to date. 

Florida . - The most prominent fact concerning ginnings in Florida 
this week is that nearly Si percent of the cotton was grouped under 
Spotted and Tinged Standards. However, for the season to date only 35 
percent falls within these Standards with 65 percent being White cotton. 



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North. Carolina .- About 7^ percent of the ginnings this week 
conformed to the Standards for White cotton(with about 71 percent "being 
Middling and better) and alDout 2^ percent to Spotted and Tinged Standards 
showing little change from last week. * k. 

Only 1 percent of the ginnings this week was less than 7/8 inch 
contrasted with 10 percent last week. The proportion of cotton 1 inch 
and longer this w$ek was J>1 percent, this "being double the percentage 
shown last week. 

South Carolina . - Ginnings this week in South Carolina showed a 
noteworthy improvement in staple but little change in grade. About 51 
percent of the cotton this week was White Middling and "better, about 11 
percent, Strict Low Middling, and about 37 percent consisted of Spotted 
and Tinged grades. 

Staple lengths this week, while longer than for last week, still 
show an average shorter than for the first part of the season. The 
South Carolina crop has a longer staple length than that of any other 
Southeastern State. For the season to date the proportions of the 
various lengths are as follows: Shorter than 7/8 inch, about 2 percent; 
7/8 inch, 31 percent; 15/lS inch, 26 percent; 1 inch, 21 percent; l-l/l6 
inch, 10 percent, and 1-l/S inch and longer, 10 percent. 

Virginia .- The outstanding fact concerning gir.^ings in this State 
this week is that about 9^ percent of the ginnings was White Middling 
and better. 

Nearly 90 percent of the week's ginnings was included within lengths 
7/8 inch and 15/16 inch with 71 percent being 7/8 inch. 



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If 




UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
Bureau of Agricultural Economics 
BoeWVto Division of Cotton Marketing 

Atlanta, Georgia^ 

Release - 11:00 a m. CS.T. V-l B ^toher ik, 1933 - 

COTTON GRADE AND STAPLE REPORTS FOR WEEK ENDING- OCTOBER 12 
The cotton ginned this week in the Sout^^tern 1, State sisyower in 
grade than that ginned lact week hut the staple doe*s^?o*tr~sirow a pronounced 
change . 

Less than 50 percent of the ginnings this week in Georgia, Alahana, 
and South Carolina is White cotton of Middling and "better grades. North 
Carolina and Virginia have 62 percent and 71 percent, respectively, while 
the report for Florida shows only ahout 28 percent to he White Middling 
and "better. For the season to date the proportions of White Middling and 
"better for the Southeastern States ranges from 57 percent in South Carolina 
to 7^ per cent in Virginia. 

The proportion of cotfen conforming to the Spotted and Tinged Standards 
is increased this we ek over last week. Ahout kc to k$ percent of the ginning: 
this week in Georgia, Alahama, and South Carolina is Spotted and Tinged 
cotton. Reports for North Carolina and Virginia each show ahout 25 percent 
while the report for Florida shows percent of the ginnings this week to 
he Spotted and Tinged. 

The percentage of cotton untenderable on futures contracts is 
greatest in Alahana and Virginia and lowest in South Carolina. Reports 
for Alahama and Virginia each show 11 percent untenderahle to date this 
season; Georgia has 8.5 percent, Florida nearly 6 percent, North Carolina 
ahout 5 percent, and South Carolina only 2.6 percent. The untenderahle cotton 
this year is principally the result* of staple shorter than 7/3 inch rather 
than low grades. 

South Carolina continues to lead in staple length one inch and longer 
with 39 percent for the season to date. The other Southeastern States rank 
as follows with respect to staple one inch and longer: North Carolina 25 
percent, Georgia 10 percent, Alabama 5 percent, Virginia U- percent, and 
Florida 2 percent. 

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~? 3 3 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

Bureau of Agricultural Economics 
Division of Cotton Marketing 

Atlanta^ 

Release - 11:00 a.m. CS.T. October 

COTTON GRADE AND STAPLE REPORTS FOR 77EEK ENDING OCTOBER 19 




Georgia . - About "]2 percent ofN^ afe; : cotto f if^g air^ned in Georgia this 
season to date was applicable to the - standards for White- cotton, 27 percent 
was Spotted and Tinged, less than 1 percent conformed to the Extra "»7hite 
standards, and only a negligible amount was Stained. 

The White cotton, which was f2 percent of the total, consisted of 
57 percent Middling and "better and 15 percent of grades below Middling. 

A large proportion of the current crop in Georgia, 65 percent, had 
a staple length of 7/3 inch. Seven percent was shorter than 7/3 inch, 18 
percent was 15/l6 inch, and nearly. 10 percent was 1 inch and longer. 

Alabama . - The report for Alabama reveals that -to fetGvS^ percent of 
the ginnings in Alabrma was 7/hite cotton, about 30 percent was Spotted and 
Tinged, and nearly 1 percent was Extra White. Most of the White cotton, 
66 percent of the total classed, was Middling and better, leaving only 
3 percent below Middling. 

A preponderating proportion of the cotton in Alabama this season, 
as in former years, was 7/8 inch in staple length, the percentage being 
71 percent, About 11 percent was shorter than 7/8 inch, 13 percent was 
15/l6 inch, and only about 5 percent was 1 inch and longer. 

Florida . - Fifty- six percent of the crop in Florida ';o date was 
White Middling and better, k percent was below Middling White, and ^0 per- 
cent was Spotted and Tinged. 

A great preponderance of the cotton in Florida, SI percent, was 
7/S inch in staple length. Six percent was shorter than 7/8 inch, 11 
percent was 15/l6 inch, and 2 percent was 1 inch and longer. 

South Carolina . - About 68. percent of the So^.th Carolina crop this 
season was White cotton, consisting of 56 percent Middling and better and 
12 percent below Middling. One percent was found to be applicable to the 
Extra White standards. About 31 percent was of Spotted and Tinged grades 



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&ii^'i>Tw»._atheT-^^.x>T~cla.o»^icatdo ia «»» including .Stain c y aflioimJ^dL to than 
1 percent to date. 

South. Carolina continues to show a much longer average staple length 
than any other Southeastern, State. Less than 2 percent of the current crop 
was shorter than 7/3 inch. Thirty- three percent was 7/8 inch and 27 percent 
was 15/l6 inch. Nearly 20 percent was 1 inch, 9 percent was 1-1 /l 6 inch, 
and also about 9 percent was 1-1 /g inch and longer. 

North Carolina . - This State has had larger proportions of Extra 
White and White cotton and smaller proportions of Spotted and Tinged cotton 
than any other Southeastern State. About 3 percent of the total to date 
was Extra White; 7^" percent, White; and 23 percent, Spotted and Tinged. 
The White cotton, 7^ percent of the total, consist d of 68 percent Middling 
and better grades and about 6 percent of grades below Middling. 

The pr edouinating staple lengths in Worth Carolina have been inch 
(ko percent of total) and 15/16 inch(30 percent of total). Over U percent 
of the crop was shorter than 7/3 inch. Twenty-one percent was 1 inch and 
about 5 percent' was l-l/l6 inch and longer. 

There has been a greater proportion of 1 inch staple ginned in 
Worth Carolina this season than in any other Southeastern State; however, 
South Carolina ginned larger proportions of l-l/l6 inch and 1-1/8 inch. 

Virginia . - Gunnings in Virginia to date show a larger proportion 
of White Middling and better than any other Southeastern State. Seventy- 
six percent being Middling and better grades. Virginia also shows the 
smallest porportion of Spotted and Tinged cotton, 22 percent. 

The staple length of the Virginia crop to date is as follows: 
Shorter than j/S inch, 10 percent; ~{/& inch, 6l percent; 15/16 inch, 
25 percent; and 1 inch, k percent. 



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r> O / JJ (^4 4, UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE I # JUL 3 ]Qaa 

V B"ureau of Agricultural Econo;..j.cs ^ 

Division of Cotton Marheting Dip 
ReS9tV» Release - 11:00 a.m. CS.T. ^ ^ Atlanta, "frsarj ijf, AGRiCUg 

October 2871933 

COTTON GRADE AMD STAPLE REPORTS FOR WEEK ENDING OCTOBER 26 
The weekly grade and staple reports for the States in the Southeast 
show improvement in grades for cotton ginned this week compared to grades 
Inst week, except for the States of Florida and Virginia. There are increased 
proportions of the higher grades, White Strict Middling and "better, in Georgia, 
Alahama, North Carolina, and South Carolina. Florida and Virginia show reduced 
proportions of White Strict Middling and better grades. 

The staple of the cotton representing ginnings for this week is 
generally "better than last week. Cotton 1 inch and longer is in greater pro- 
portions in Georgia, Alabama, Florida, and South Carolina, while North 
Carolina and Virginia show declines. Each of the Southeastern States shows 
reduced proportions of cotton shorter than ~f/o inch. 

Georgia . - About 2o percent of the cotton in Georgia to date is White 
Strict Middling and "better grades and about the same amount is White Middling. 
The Limestone Valleys in northwest Georgia(Di strict l) have produced the Lest 
grades with 53 percent ^t r ict Middling and "better, while the Sand and Clay 
Hills district in southwest Georgia has produced the smallest proportion of 
White Strict Middling and better, 12 percent of the ginnings in that district. 

Ginnings in Georgia to date show 6 percent shorter than ~]/o inch and 
9 percent one inch and longer, showing that the bulk of the crop is 7/Si^cfe and 
15/l6 inch. District 1, the Limestone Valleys, has not only rro r^ce i the. b?at 
grades thus far this season, but- this district also leads the other districts 
in Georgia in staple length. Only two percent in. this district has "been shorter 
than 7/8 inch, while 15 percent has "been 1 inch and longer. 

Alabama . To date ginnings in Alabama show 28 percent White Strict 
Middling and better. District 1, the Limestone Valleys, has ginned the 
largest percentage of Strict Middling and better, ]>k percent of total for 
district, while the Black Belt in central Alabama has produced the smallest 
percentage of Strict Middling and better, 23 percent. 

District 1 has also produced the largest proportion of the longer staple 
lenjfths. Ten percent of the cotton ginned in this district has bp-firi J i.n^h arxd 



- d. ~ 

longer. The S^ndy Coastal Plains, comprising the greater ;D?>y fe-l&n of southern 
and Western Alabama, show the smallest proportion of 1 inch and longer, only 
2 percent. The State as a whole has produced about H-l/2 percent 1 inch and 
longer, and 10 percent shorter than ~[jo inch. Seventy- two percent has "been 
7/o inch and 13 percent has been 15/16 inch. » 

South Carolina . - The proportion of vfiite Strict Middling and "better 
grades ginned to date is only 1 percent of total ginned in District X, the 
Flatwoods. In District 2, the Sand and Clay Hills, the proportion of Strict 
Middling and "better is 30 percent. For the State as a whole 19 percent of 
ginnings to date has been White Strict Middling and bettdr grades. 

South Carolina has produced a significant amount of cotton 1-l/S inch 
and longer. The Sand and Clay Hills, District 2, has produced the largest 
proportion of this long staple with about 30 percent 1-l/S inch and longer. 
District 1, the Piedmont area, shows less than 1 percent 1-l/S inch and'longer 
District 3. "the Sandy Coastal Plains, shows 1^4 percent, and District k, the 
Platwoods, 1 percent. Por the State the proportion of 1-l/S inch and longer 
is 9 percent. Less than 2 percent of ginnings in South Carolina to data is 
shorter than 7/2 inch. 

North Carolina . - About 31 percent of the cotton ginned in North 
Carolina to date is White Strict Middling and better grades* / ■'. t.TO0¥ 
the districts comprising this State show widely varying proportions of 
Strict Middling and better . Seventy-eight percent of the ginning s in 
Dis^ri.cit 2, the Slate Belt, is White Strict Middling and better, while in 
District U, the Flatwoods, less than 5 percent of ginnings has been Strict 
Middling and better. District 1, the Piedmont area, and District 3> the 
Coastal Plains, show kS percent and IS percent, respectively, of White Strict 
Middling and better grades. 

Over 25 percent of ginnings in North Carolina to date has been 1 inch 
and longer in staple length. About h percent has been shorter than inch; 
39 percent, f/B inch; and over 31 percent has been 15/l6 inch. 



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